Surface Tension of Liquids (Water, Chloroform and Acetone) by Capillary Rise Method

Authors

  • Dipak Raj Adhikari Central Department of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Mid- West University, Birendranagar, Surkhet Nepal
  • Tek Bahadur Budha Central Department of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Mid- West University, Birendranagar, Surkhet Nepal
  • Anup Basnet Central Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Mid- West University, Birendranagar, Surkhet Nepal
  • Shesh Kant Adhikari Department of Physics, Birendra Multiple Campus, Tribhuvan University, Nepal
  • Shiva Pd. Baral Department of Physics, Amrit Science Campus, Tribhuvan University, Nepal

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3126/bmcjsr.v6i1.60948

Keywords:

capillary tube, surface tension; liquid (Water, Chloroform, Acetone)

Abstract

Surface tension is a crucial property of liquids that depends on the liquid's composition. This study aims to compare the surface tension of water, chloroform, and acetone using the capillary rise method. It involves using a capillary tube with a known radius, dipping it vertically into a liquid, and measuring the height to which the liquid rises in the tube. The surface tension of the liquid can then be measured experimentally. This relates to height of the liquid in the tube, the radius of the tube, and the surface tension of the liquid. The height of the liquid in the tube is dependent on the radius of the tube, with a smaller radius resulting in a greater height. The surface tension of the liquid is inversely related to the radius of the capillary tube.

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Published

2023-12-22

How to Cite

Adhikari, D. R., Budha, T. B., Basnet, A., Adhikari, S. K., & Baral, S. P. (2023). Surface Tension of Liquids (Water, Chloroform and Acetone) by Capillary Rise Method. BMC Journal of Scientific Research, 6(1), 31–36. https://doi.org/10.3126/bmcjsr.v6i1.60948

Issue

Section

Research Article