An assessment of the Human-Elephant conflict in Sapahi and Kakadi Village of Kolhabi Municipality, Bara, Nepal

Authors

  • Akshay Chaudhary Pokhara Campus, Institute of Forestry, Tribhuvan University, Pokhara 33700, Nepal
  • Sachin Timilsina Pokhara Campus, Institute of Forestry, Tribhuvan University, Pokhara 33700, Nepal
  • Subash Gautam Pokhara Campus, Institute of Forestry, Tribhuvan University, Pokhara 33700, Nepal
  • Prajwol Babu Subedi Pokhara Campus, Institute of Forestry, Tribhuvan University, Pokhara 33700, Nepal

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3126/on.v19i1.41223

Keywords:

Conflict, crop damage, mitigation, perception, wild elephant

Abstract

This study aims to assess the trend, extent, and impact of Human-Elephant conflict (HEC) in Sapahi and Kakadi villages of Bara district. Direct field observation, Household Survey (HHs), Focus Group Discussions (FGDs), and Key Informant Interview (KII) were carried out during November and December 2016 where 11 wards were selected purposively from two village and 50 households from each village. Also, 12 KII and one FGDs from each ward were performed. SPSS 20.0, and MS Excel 2016 were used to calculate mean, percentage, frequency count, and chi-square test was used to determine the variation in people’s perception towards wild Elephant conservation. The total average damage of paddy per year per HHs was 834.1 kg followed by wheat 153.7 kg, and mustard 2.12 kg. The economic value of average annual crop damage per year per HHs accounted for NRs. 22669.70. Among total HHs, 84% of the respondents said that the trend of crop damage is increasing, 10% found no differences in crop damage, and remaining 6% said decreasing. During the last 5 years, 7 people were injured, and 6 were killed. The lighting fire, beating drum, and making noise were the local techniques used by all the respondents to chase away elephant for the mitigation of HEC. The farmers also guard their fields at night time. 60% of the respondents are positive towards elephant conservation and remaining 40% seems no significance for conservation. The compensation scheme for crop damage should be properly implemented in the study area to minimize the HEC. A sustained conservation education program especially focusing on female, farmers, and nomads are recommended to conserve wild elephants, and their habitat.

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Published

2021-12-14

How to Cite

Chaudhary, A., Timilsina, S., Gautam, S., & Subedi, P. B. (2021). An assessment of the Human-Elephant conflict in Sapahi and Kakadi Village of Kolhabi Municipality, Bara, Nepal. Our Nature, 19(1), 27–36. https://doi.org/10.3126/on.v19i1.41223

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Articles