Teething Beliefs, Misconceptions, and Practices Among Mothers Attending a Tertiary Hospital in Nigeria: Implications for Child Health and Clinical Practice

  • Oladele Simeon Olatunya Department of Paediatrics, College of Medicine, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti and Department of Paediatrics, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2564-3064
  • Adewuyi Temidayo Adeniyi Department of Paediatrics, College of Medicine, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti and Department of Paediatrics, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti
  • Adefunke Olarinre Babatola Department of Paediatrics, College of Medicine, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti and Department of Paediatrics, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti
  • Odunayo Tolulope Fatunla Department of Paediatrics, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti
  • Oyebanji Anthony Olajuyin Department of Ear, Nose, and Throat, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado Ekiti
  • Ezra Olatunde Ogundare Department of Paediatrics, College of Medicine, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti and Department of Paediatrics, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti
  • Akinwumi Kolawole Komolafe Department of Paediatrics, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti
  • Joseph Olusesan Fadare Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti
  • Oyeku Akibu Oyelami Department of Paediatrics, College of Medicine, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti and Department of Paediatrics, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti
Keywords: Beliefs, Harmful practices, Misconceptions, Mothers, Teething, Nigeria

Abstract

Introduction: Teething is a physiologic process that begins during infancy. However, some mothers often attribute certain symptoms to teething. In this study, we assessed the opinions and practices of mothers attending a tertiary health facility in Nigeria on teething.

Methods: This was a cross-sectional, descriptive study conducted among caregivers of children presenting to the out-patient department of a tertiary hospital, Southwestern Nigeria.

Results: Five hundred and sixteen mothers were studied. The leading symptoms attributed to teething were fever 420 (81.4%), reduced food intake / appetite 320 (62.0%), diarrhoea 314 (60.9%) and vomiting 294 (57.0%). Some believed that teething is associated with convulsion 102 (19.8%), mouth ulcers 69 (13.4%), ear discharge 68 (13.2%), and no symptoms 41 (7.9%). Majority of the mothers 374 (72.5%) believed that teething requires treatment. Two hundred and four (39.5%) mothers had given their children oral analgesics for teething while 194 (37.6%) administered teething mixtures. These medications were more likely to be prescribed at the hospital or purchased over the counter (p < 0.05). Other treatments given included herbal concoction 46 (8.9%), local tooth extraction 22 (4.3%), enema 17 (3.3%), body scarifications 14 (2.7%), gum fomentation 14 (2.7%) and gum incision 12 (2.3%). Responders who attributed convulsion to teething were more likely to have incised their children’s gums (p < 0.05).

Conclusions: This study revealed that sundry symptoms were attributed to teething and harmful home interventions were done for teething. There is a need to educate the society on teething and discourage harmful practices for teething by caregivers.

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Abstract
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Published
2020-12-15
How to Cite
Olatunya, O., Adeniyi, A., Babatola, A., Fatunla, O., Olajuyin, O., Ogundare, E., Komolafe, A., Fadare, J., & Oyelami, O. (2020). Teething Beliefs, Misconceptions, and Practices Among Mothers Attending a Tertiary Hospital in Nigeria: Implications for Child Health and Clinical Practice. Journal of Nepal Paediatric Society, 40(3), 247-254. https://doi.org/10.3126/jnps.v40i3.30008
Section
Original Articles