Health Prospect https://nepjol.info/index.php/HPROSPECT <p>Health Prospect is an open access and peer reviewed public health journal. Free full text articles are available.</p> <p>The journal is now accepting online submissions. For information on the process <a href="/index.php/HPROSPECT/information/authors" target="_self">click here</a>.</p> Nepal Public Health Students' Society en-US Health Prospect 2091-2021 Kidney health risk of migrant workers: An issue we can no longer overlook https://nepjol.info/index.php/HPROSPECT/article/view/38675 <p>Not applicable as this is an editorial.&nbsp;</p> Nirmal Aryal Pramod R Regmi Arun Sedhain Radheyshyam Krishna KC Erwin Martinez Faller Aney Rijal Edwin van Teijlingen Copyright (c) 2021 Health Prospect http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 2021-08-27 2021-08-27 20 1 15 17 10.3126/hprospect.v20i1.38675 PhD supervision in Public Health https://nepjol.info/index.php/HPROSPECT/article/view/32735 <p>Roles of PhD supervisors are diverse, ranging from providing in-depth discipline-specific Public Health knowledge and technical (e.g., methodological) support to the students, encouraging them towards publications or conference presentations, offering pastoral support for student wellbeing, and finally preparing them to defend their thesis by conducting a mock viva. Effective supervision plays a vital role in a PhD journey reflecting on the quality of the PhD work, positive PhD experience, and supervisor-student relationship. While some student-supervisors team may encounter conflicting and challenging relationships, many relationships between PhD supervisor(s) and students progress into mentorship through joint publications and grant applications, career advice, and support establishing wider collaborative networks. Drawing from the wider experiences of the authors, this article highlights the responsibilities, opportunities, and sometimes the challenging nature of being a PhD supervisor. This reflection will inform good practices for PhD supervisors in countries including Nepal, where the numbers of PhD students in the field of Public Health is steadily increasing.</p> Pramod R Regmi Amudha Poobalan Padam Simkhada Edwin van Teijlingen Copyright (c) 2021 Health Prospect: Journal of Public Health 2021-03-26 2021-03-26 20 1 1 4 10.3126/hprospect.v20i1.32735 Publishing, identifiers & metrics: Playing the numbers game https://nepjol.info/index.php/HPROSPECT/article/view/37391 <p>The number of scientific articles published each year is rapidly growing and so is the number of academic journals. This makes it impossible for an individual practitioner or researcher to keep track of all research published in their own field or sub-discipline. With the growing amount of publications, it is also becoming more difficult to distinguish between similar papers published on the same topic, in the same journal, or by the same researchers (or research team). This perspective paper could support students and novice researchers, outlines the difference between the unique identifier for: (1) you as the researcher, (2) a specific paper; and (3) a specific journal. This paper further outlines the various numerical identifiers associated with academic publishing to help demystify academic publishing.</p> Edwin R van Teijlingen Shovita Dhakal Adhikari Pramod R Regmi Alexander van Teijlingen Nirmal Aryal Sarita Panday Copyright (c) 2021 Health Prospect http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 2021-10-25 2021-10-25 20 1 18 21 10.3126/hprospect.v20i1.37391 Role of Community Medicine experts in the changing epidemiological context of Nepal https://nepjol.info/index.php/HPROSPECT/article/view/29059 <p>Community Medicine experts are a valuable resource for a stronger health care system in Nepal. They have made significant contributions to the health sector yet have remained largely under-utilized in the national health care system. The health system is likely to be restructured considering the current COVID-19 pandemic and this is the right opportunity to utilize this pool of experts at different levels of the health system.</p> Pranil Man Singh Pradhan Copyright (c) 2021 Health Prospect 2021-05-27 2021-05-27 20 1 5 7 10.3126/hprospect.v20i1.29059 Sexual Risk Behavior among Youths of Nepal: Further analysis of Nepal Demographic Health Survey https://nepjol.info/index.php/HPROSPECT/article/view/30211 <p><strong>Background</strong>: The period of youth is the time of major physical changes in the body that precedes psychosocial maturity. The curious mind of youths predisposes them to practice sexual risk behaviors. The aim of this study is to identify the sexual risk behavior and factors associated with sexual behaviors among youths of Nepal.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> This was a retrospective analysis of 6524 youths aged 15-24 years using data obtained from the Nepal Demographic and Health Survey for the year 2016.&nbsp; The outcome was sexual behaviors and the determinants were socio-demographic characteristics and smoking. Statistical analysis was done using chi-square tests to assess statistically significant associations between determinants and outcome. In order to identify the most important determinants with the outcome, significant predictors in the univariate analysis were then included in logistic regression.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> The prevalence of premarital sex among the youths was 5.2%, nearly half of them were sexually active and 5.5% had multiple sex partners. Variables that were significantly associated with premarital sex in the presence of other variables included male gender (AOR=6.3,95% CI=4.3,13.2) and smoker (AOR=2.4, 95%CI=1.8,3.16). Variables that were significantly associated with recent sexual activity in the presence of other variables included female gender (AOR=1.36,95%CI=1.18,1.58), age group (AOR=8.3,95% CI= 7.3,9.3), rural residence (AOR=1.4, 95% CI=1.26,1.62), illiterate youths (AOR=4.34,95% CI=3.27,5.76), poor wealth index (AOR=0.6, 95% CI=0.5,0.68) and smoker (AOR=3.38,95% CI=2.57,4.46). Variables that were significantly associated with multiple sexual partners in the presence of other variables included male gender (AOR=5.5, 95% CI=2.58,7.05) and smoker (AOR=2.2,95% CI=1.6,3.05).&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Conclusion</strong>: The male and smoker youths were more likely to practice all forms of sexual risk behaviors. This study recommends the need for further studies to understand the factors responsible for sexual risk behavior among youths. Furthermore, it is imperative to provide comprehensive sexuality education for youths.</p> Sampurna Kakchapati Sumina Oli Dikshika Bhandari Copyright (c) 2021 Health Prospect 2021-06-12 2021-06-12 20 1 8 14 10.3126/hprospect.v20i1.30211